Video Games, Everybody Loves Them

Just a month after me claiming that Xbox Achievements were the Boy Scout Merit Badge of today’s generation, the Boy Scouts of America have actually created a video game merit badge! This might be the easiest merit badge to get. Even easier than the Eat A Sandwich badge or the Remember to Wipe badge.
In more video game news, somebody call MENSA, because there is a new genius in town. Super Mario Crossover takes the original NES game, and allows you to play as other classic video game characters. Haven’t you always wondered how Mega Man would stack up against the Hammer Bros?
One more thing, Valve has until end of day tomorrow to release it’s Steam client for Mac, as they promised to do so before the end of April. Please don’t let me down.

See you guys soon.

Travel Back in Time

If you didn’t read The New Rules for Highly Evolved Humans in the August 2009 issue of Wired, than you are probably screwing up your life on a daily basis. I’m not saying that all the rules should be followed to a tee, in fact, some of the rules I object to entirely. They are all worth a read though, just to get a glimpse of what Wired writers believe to be mandatory etiquette. I am in particular favor of the following:
• If you bought it, you can rip it.
• Ignore your ex on Facebook
• Rotate your photos before you upload them.
• Balance your media diet (although I disagree that Facebook should get more time than video games. That’s just absurd.)
• Turn off “Sent from my iPhone” signature (should be done as soon as you open the box.)
• Dont type BRB, just go and come back.
• Avoid looking at other people’s screens.
• Hide your speaker wire (I’m trying, but it’s tough with a rental with hardwood floors.)
• Don’t work all the time, you’ll live to regret it.
• Wearing headphones means do not disturb.
And most importantly:
• Sometimes you have to break the rules.
These are just my favorites. You can see all the rules here.

Can’t Beat A Classic

Attention any dudes that I met between the years 2003 and 2008, there’s a very good chance that we have shared some memorable experiences shooting each other in the face, butting each other with rifles and filling the chateau with smoke grenades. This week, Call of Duty “Classic” was released on Xbox Live and the far inferior Playstation Network.
Steps:
Go buy yourself an Xbox.
Internet it.
Download game.
Yell “Where’s the damn map!?”
Die by the wrath of my gewehr.

To anybody that isn’t interested in Call of Duty, here’s something that may take care of you.

Xbox Block

Today Microsoft banned millions of Xbox Live users for playing on modified systems and using pirated copies of games, most likely the new Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2. I have mixed feelings about the ban. The users have purchased the Xbox, and should have full authority to mod it however they feel necessary. That’s what I feel is entalled in owning something. Where it gets dicey for me is when those customers start to play with legit (according to Microsoft’s TOS) players. A modified system is, basically, able to cheat. Being on the shit end of the stick can sour the whole experience for a player and eventually result in fewer subscribers to the Xbox Live service and possibly lower sales for the companies that put so much into their products.
What if Apple banned customers from it’s iTunes store if they found out you were using iTunes to organize and watch pirated movies?
What if a grocery store wouldn’t let you in because you brought your own cart?
Overall, the banned players probably got what the deserved.

You can read what xboxist has to say here.

Video Games in Real Life

Sometimes I’m playing a video game and I think to myself “Yo dude, it’d be really cool if all this stuff could happen in real life.” That “stuff” that I’m referring to is usually ridiculous skate tricks, space bending portals and jumping a dirtbike 50′ to flatground with no adverse outcomes.
One thing I don’t really need to see in real life is floating text alerting me to points of interest.

Thanks anyways Macy’s, but I can make my own hot list.